Crisis in the Arts: Why the Left Owns the Culture and How Conservatives can Begin to Take it Back

crisisA powerful pamphlet published by the David Horowitz Freedom Center, Crisis in the Arts: Why the Left Owns the Culture and How Conservatives can Begin to Take it Back, is authored by the best-selling author Andrew Klavan.  It profoundly demonstrates that it is not enough for conservatives to bemoan the hostile takeover of the culture and reveals a battle plan for fighting the culture war.

Watch the video below where Jamie Glazov discusses Klavan’s profound pamphlet (16:50 mark) — and make sure to order the pamphlet here.

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2 thoughts on “Crisis in the Arts: Why the Left Owns the Culture and How Conservatives can Begin to Take it Back”

  1. All true.
    However, this approach is just as “good guy, bad guy” as the Left’s.
    It is difficult to cast an “anti-racist” as evil.
    The screenplays required for the Conservative Argument are more involved than a Superman Comic, which suffice for the Left’s Bandwagon, and require a more sophisticated audience to appreciate. It’s actually the stuff of Literature.
    Yes, we have to fight.
    But we’re not going to win by just waving the flag. The Left does that, too.
    Somehow, we have to present the paradox of the human condition in a way that’s compelling without succumbing to Nihilism : that success on this Earth is never more than the lesser of the Evils rather than constructing Utopia.
    That is not easy.
    Not to say that it hasn’t been done, but it is a rare talent that has achieved it and, even then, it generally leaves Progs in the dust.
    “Raja 1918” and “The Caine Mutiny” are good examples, but talk to a Prog about them, and you find they missed the point.
    There is no Progressive type hero in them, just human beings.
    “Der Untergang” is also taking criticism for presenting Hitler as a human being rather than the caricature we’re all familiar with. Of course, we don’t want Hitler to be human. Then, he’s too much like all the rest of us. That’s not a pleasant feeling.
    But, that’s part of the fight, too.

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