Glazov Gang: Rise of the Sex Machines

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Order Jamie Glazov’s new book: Jihadist Psychopath: How He Is Charming, Seducing, and Devouring Us.

This new edition of The Glazov Gang is joined by Barak Lurie, the author of the new upcoming book, The Rise of the Sex Machines.

Barak discusses The Rise of the Sex Machines and unveils where our Orgasm-to-Go culture is taking us — and who will resist.

Don’t miss it!

Also check out Barak’s 4-Part Series below — in which he unveils How Atheism Kills:

Part I: Atheism Kills: The Dangers of a World Without God – And Cause for Hope.

Part 2: Godlessness = Abortion, Eugenics and China’s One-Child Policy.

Part 3: Hitler was NO Christian.

Part 4: Five Wrong Assumptions of Atheists.

Subscribe to the Glazov Gang‘s YouTube Channel and follow us on Twitter: @JamieGlazov.

2 thoughts on “Glazov Gang: Rise of the Sex Machines”

  1. That was a fascinating interview with Mr. Lurie. Interestingly, the PBS series Shetland has had some insightful and unusual scenes regarding male/female relationships. The main character, Jimmy Perez, a widower, backs away from a wholesale commitment to a new relationship with a woman he cares about because of his concerns with the whole issue of the man/woman relationship, resulting from something that he saw at his office that made him hesitant. It is the first time I have ever seen anything on TV in recent years where the man showed distress about having a physical relationship with a woman because of his uncertainty about the whole issue of male/female interaction and personal commitment. Usually the standard script on TV typically is: the man “conquers” the woman, i.e., has sex with her and then moves on without any genuine commitment or thoughtfulness about what that means. I will be interested in buying Mr. Lurie’s book and getting his male perspective on this. I wonder whether Mr. Lurie’s upbringing as a Jew and the importance of family relationships in the Jewish household might have played a role in his writing on this topic.
    By the way, the Shetland series is also working through the issue of a young female police officer who was raped during her role as a policewoman and how she is trying to cope with it, as well as how the other people around her are dealing with it and her.

    1. I agree that Shetland makes some real strides in a more moral approach to these thorny relationship and abuse/rape issues. I’m watching a Netflix show right now called “Unbelievable” that explores the issue of how American culture approaches the treatment of rape victims. It’s well worth watching.

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